reflection, Scenery

Perspective

This photo of Landscape Arch was taken a couple of years ago at Arches National Park. It is a good example of how perceptions depend on your perspective. I think it is hard to get any real idea of just how high and long this Arch is. There is no real sense of depth/distance and nothing in the photo gives a sense of size.

Landscape Arch has the longest span of any natural Arch in the US (290 feet) and is 77 feet high. Amazingly, at the thinnest point, it is only 6 feet thick. You can no longer walk under the Arch because some large chunks (over 30 feet long) fell off in the 1990s.

It is also hard to gain perspective on the problems and challenges that people face in their lives. It’s easy to assume that someone “has it made.” Little do we know the difficulties they may be facing. Thankfully, God not only knows the challenges each of us face, God provides what we need to face them.

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reflection, Scenery

Artsy

When we travel, I take a lot of what I would “touristy” photos. The kinds of shots many people would take when traveling to that location. I’ve been blessed with the opportunity to to travel to so many amazing places in the past few years. It’s not hard to take great photos when you’re somewhere like the Grand Canyon or Glacier National Park.

I also try to take photos that I would call “artsy.” Maybe something most people would see but not take a picture of. Sometimes, a view from a spot that gives a unique perspective on a common sight. In the picture below, I was struck by the contrast between the tree in the foreground and city of Albuquerque in the distance.

In a similar way, there are some Bible passages that have a clear meaning. Other times, I appreciate being able to read the reflections of others for a perspective that I would not have on my own. Among the many resources available, I suggest looking at the daily reflections from itemissaest.org or jesuitprayer.org.

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reflection, Scenery

Standing Out

This is a view of the Sandia Mountains, taken from inside a stone cabin/shelter built in the 1930s. The shelter was designed to blend in with the surroundings.

The idea of blending in can be a good one. Animals often try to blend into their environment as a mechanism of defense. Adolescents will go to great lengths to blend in (fit in) with peers. It feels comfortable to fit it.

On the other hand, we are called to be a light on lampstand and a city on a hill. The photo reminds me that while I am comfortable fitting it, I am called to stand out.

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