God in all things, Seeing God

Highlights

This photo was taken on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone at Inspiration Point. When I was first reviewing the pictures from this spot, I did not initially realize that the Lower Falls were in sight, because they are so far off in the distance. In fact, it is difficult to determine (from this photo) if the falls are on the same river as seen at the bottom of the canyon. We had just come from the Lower Falls, so I already knew they were. Not to mention the multiple maps showing the connection.

Even if we can’t easily connect all the points, the highlights clearly stand out. And while we often remember these as “God moments”, God is with us in the valleys too.

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God in all things, Scenery, Seeing God

God’s Palette

This photo was taken at the Artists Paint Pots in Yellowstone. These are a group of hot springs and mudpots. Mudpots have no direct connection to underground water but steam and hydrogen sulfide gas bubble through the ground. Microorganisms breakdown the underlying rock, which produces the “mud.” Minerals in the rock contribute to the various colors seen.

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God in all things, Scenery, Seeing God

Peace

For various reasons, the word that comes to mind when I look at this photo is “peaceful.” I realized long ago that being near the ocean or other large body of water gave me a feeling of peace. The sun and mild breeze add to the peaceful feeling. Peace is so much more than the absence of conflict (worldly peace).

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give it to you. Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid.

John 14:27

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God in all things, Scenery, Seeing God

What’s in a name?

This is a photo of the Yellowstone River, taken from the top of the lower falls. That mist at the bottom of the photo is coming from the falls. The name, Yellowstone, was from the Hidatsa name which was translated as Yellow Rock River. It is not certain what the origin of this name was but it seems possible that it is related to the color of the rock in the Grand Canyon as seen in this photo.

God is identified as “Yahweh” in the Bible, usually translated as “LORD” in English. Yahweh is actually pronunciation of the Hebrew for “I am.” A simple name with deep meaning. God is and was and always will be. The source of all that exists. Even yellow rock.

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God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

Perspective

This is a photo from the second time we visited the Grand Prismatic Spring. Quite a different view compared to our first visit 2 days earlier. The first day we were there, it was cold and drizzly. It was hard to see much of the water because there was so much steam rising. And with very little sun, the predominant color was grey. (Is grey a color?) The second visit, there was much less visible stream rising and the contrast in colors was striking.

I’m sure we have all had the experience of not “seeing” what if right before us the first time we encounter it. There are many instances in the New Testament that refer to individuals being prevented from seeing (understanding) what was happening. For me, this is another way to think about “perspective.”

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God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

God with us

This was a view from near the top of amount Washburn in Yellowstone. The Grand Canyon is seen crossing in the center of the photo with Yellowstone Lake behind it. In the distance, you can see the mountains where the Yellowstone River begins. It was literally breathtaking, but some of that may have been due to the hike to over 10,000 feet.

It’s an incredible feeling, having such a vantage point. Very different than what you would see from an airplane. In fact, we flew directly over Yellowstone as we were traveling home. From far away, such on a plane, everything looks very two dimensional.

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God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

Old Faithful

Old Faithful was the first geyser to be named in Yellowstone. It’s eruptions are not only fairly often but probably the most predictable within the park. It erupts about 17 times per day with an interval of 50 to 110 minutes. Short eruptions (less than 2.5 minutes) are typically followed by approximately 60 minute interval. Eruptions longer than 2.5 minutes are typically followed by approximately 90 minute interval.

Eruptions can shoot water as high as 185 feet; water temperature at the surface has been measured at 204°F with a steam temperature greater than 350°F.

I hardly need to point out that we have a faithful God.

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