God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

Perspective

This is a photo from the second time we visited the Grand Prismatic Spring. Quite a different view compared to our first visit 2 days earlier. The first day we were there, it was cold and drizzly. It was hard to see much of the water because there was so much steam rising. And with very little sun, the predominant color was grey. (Is grey a color?) The second visit, there was much less visible stream rising and the contrast in colors was striking.

I’m sure we have all had the experience of not “seeing” what if right before us the first time we encounter it. There are many instances in the New Testament that refer to individuals being prevented from seeing (understanding) what was happening. For me, this is another way to think about “perspective.”

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God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

God with us

This was a view from near the top of amount Washburn in Yellowstone. The Grand Canyon is seen crossing in the center of the photo with Yellowstone Lake behind it. In the distance, you can see the mountains where the Yellowstone River begins. It was literally breathtaking, but some of that may have been due to the hike to over 10,000 feet.

It’s an incredible feeling, having such a vantage point. Very different than what you would see from an airplane. In fact, we flew directly over Yellowstone as we were traveling home. From far away, such on a plane, everything looks very two dimensional.

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God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

Old Faithful

Old Faithful was the first geyser to be named in Yellowstone. It’s eruptions are not only fairly often but probably the most predictable within the park. It erupts about 17 times per day with an interval of 50 to 110 minutes. Short eruptions (less than 2.5 minutes) are typically followed by approximately 60 minute interval. Eruptions longer than 2.5 minutes are typically followed by approximately 90 minute interval.

Eruptions can shoot water as high as 185 feet; water temperature at the surface has been measured at 204°F with a steam temperature greater than 350°F.

I hardly need to point out that we have a faithful God.

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God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

God’s Country

This photo was taken during a hike in Lamar Valley in Yellowstone. Even though it was a fairly short hike, it was one of our favorite hikes because of the animals we saw. Just before we started the hike, there was a large herd of bison that crossed our trail. We waited a few minutes to make sure they were well clear of us.

Shortly after starting the hike, I saw some movement in the distance but could not quite make out what I was seeing. Once we went up a small hill, we could see 3 or 4 pronghorn sheep running through the brush. Just a little further ahead, we saw this one by itself.

Easy to see why many call this God’s Country.

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God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

Otherworldly

This photo was taken at the Norris Geyer Basin at Yellowstone. It is almost bizarre looking with the steam rising, the unusual colors and hissing sounds, not to mention the string sulfur odor. The word that comes to mind is “otherworldly.”

This morning, we will be celebrating the life of Father Dave, who passed on last week. And we remember that this world is not our home.

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God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

Disappointed?

This photo of the Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River was taken from a spot called “Artist Point.” It was originally named in 1883 by Frank Jay Haynes (official photographer of Yellowstone NP) who mistakenly believed that the point was where Thomas Moran painted his famous 1872 depiction of the falls. The original painting is displayed in the Smithsonian Museum. It has been determined that the view was from the north rim. However, I am sure many artists have painted the falls from this point, so it is still a good name.

I mistakenly thought we would be able to see both the Upper and Lower Falls from this spot. I was disappointed to find out there was nowhere you could see both falls at the same time.

How often are we disappointed with God’s blessings?

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God in all things, reflection, Scenery, Seeing God

Knowledge

This photo was taken at Sheepeater Cliff along the Gardner River in Yellowstone. In the distance, you can see a portion of the cliff with a feature called columnar basalt. It is the result of lava forming fractures or joints as it cools rapidly. The columns often form in hexagons, but can have 3 to 12 (or more) sides. The rock face looked similar to Devils Tower to me, but the rock material is completely different and the columns at Devils Tower are much greater diameter. And scientists have multiple competing theories on how Devils Tower formed.

I am impressed by how much scientists have “figured out” about the formation of the world, but at the same time, there is so much we don’t know. I am reminded of God’s conversation with Job below, when Job thought he knew more than God.

Where were you when I founded the earth? Tell me, if you have understanding. Who determined its size? Surely you know? Who stretched out the measuring line for it? Into what were its pedestals sunk, and who laid its cornerstone, While the morning stars sang together and all the sons of God shouted for joy? Who shut within doors the sea, when it burst forth from the womb, When I made the clouds its garment and thick darkness its swaddling bands? Job 38:4-9

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